REVERSING THE TREND OF COMMODITIZATION - A case study of the strategic planning and management of a call center

Brad Poulson, Jimmy Huang, Sue Newell, Robert D. Galliers

Abstract

The paper challenges the prevalent paradigm that differentiates between the management of a core competence and commodity processes. A case study is conducted to examine the strategic planning and management of a call center to illustrate that a commodity process, such as handling customers’ complaints and enquiries, can be transformed into a core competence, if a clear strategic intent is articulated and adequate management approaches are followed. Findings derived from this study suggest that a call center can provide substantial added value to the business and be managed differently through devising an appropriate intellectual capital management approach.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Poulson B., Huang J., Newell S. and D. Galliers R. (2004). REVERSING THE TREND OF COMMODITIZATION - A case study of the strategic planning and management of a call center . In Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 3: ICEIS, ISBN 972-8865-00-7, pages 396-402. DOI: 10.5220/0002614903960402


in Bibtex Style

@conference{iceis04,
author={Brad Poulson and Jimmy Huang and Sue Newell and Robert D. Galliers},
title={REVERSING THE TREND OF COMMODITIZATION - A case study of the strategic planning and management of a call center},
booktitle={Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 3: ICEIS,},
year={2004},
pages={396-402},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0002614903960402},
isbn={972-8865-00-7},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 3: ICEIS,
TI - REVERSING THE TREND OF COMMODITIZATION - A case study of the strategic planning and management of a call center
SN - 972-8865-00-7
AU - Poulson B.
AU - Huang J.
AU - Newell S.
AU - D. Galliers R.
PY - 2004
SP - 396
EP - 402
DO - 10.5220/0002614903960402