ACCESSIBLE COMPUTER INTERACTION FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES - The case of quadriplegics

Paula Kotzé, Mariki Eloff, Ayodele Adesina-Ojo, Jan Eloff

Abstract

Universal design is the design of products and environments so that anyone can use them without adaptation or specialised design. Life must be simplified by making products, communications and the built environment more usable for as many people as possible at little or no extra cost. To understand the challenges that a disabled person has to face when using the computer, we have to know what capabilities such a person has. Only then will it be possible to apply universal design to computer interfaces. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the challenges that many people face in their everyday lives and determine to what extent disabled people, especially people with limited or no use of their hands and arms, interact independently with computer equipment. The paper specifically looks at quadriplegics, their capabilities, a survey of how they use computer equipment, as well as special devices available to assist them in this interaction.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Kotzé P., Eloff M., Adesina-Ojo A. and Eloff J. (2004). ACCESSIBLE COMPUTER INTERACTION FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES - The case of quadriplegics . In Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 5: ICEIS, ISBN 972-8865-00-7, pages 97-106. DOI: 10.5220/0002635000970106


in Bibtex Style

@conference{iceis04,
author={Paula Kotzé and Mariki Eloff and Ayodele Adesina-Ojo and Jan Eloff},
title={ACCESSIBLE COMPUTER INTERACTION FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES - The case of quadriplegics},
booktitle={Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 5: ICEIS,},
year={2004},
pages={97-106},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0002635000970106},
isbn={972-8865-00-7},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 5: ICEIS,
TI - ACCESSIBLE COMPUTER INTERACTION FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES - The case of quadriplegics
SN - 972-8865-00-7
AU - Kotzé P.
AU - Eloff M.
AU - Adesina-Ojo A.
AU - Eloff J.
PY - 2004
SP - 97
EP - 106
DO - 10.5220/0002635000970106