PITFALLS AND POTENTIALS OF SOCIAL SOFTWARE IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Ines Puntschart, Klaus Tochtermann, Gisela Dösinger

Abstract

The overwhelming success of all different types of social software, such as WIKIs, Blogs etc. is about to change the way how communities interact with each other. Most of the systems are being used on a voluntary basis run and maintained by individuals who have a deep wish to transfer and share their knowledge with others. This transfer and sharing, however, often takes place outside any educational setting even though the main purpose of educational settings such as universities is to educate students through sharing and transferring knowledge. Up to now social software tools are used very rarely in universities to support teaching and training, and this is the case even though students are keen on using exactly these tools in their spare time. This observation leads to the guiding research question for our work: How can social software be used most effectively and efficiently in higher education? In order to find answers we conducted four case studies at Graz University of Technology with more than 350 students involved.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Puntschart I., Tochtermann K. and Dösinger G. (2006). PITFALLS AND POTENTIALS OF SOCIAL SOFTWARE IN HIGHER EDUCATION . In Proceedings of WEBIST 2006 - Second International Conference on Web Information Systems and Technologies - Volume 2: WEBIST, ISBN 978-972-8865-47-4, pages 21-28. DOI: 10.5220/0001256100210028


in Bibtex Style

@conference{webist06,
author={Ines Puntschart and Klaus Tochtermann and Gisela Dösinger},
title={PITFALLS AND POTENTIALS OF SOCIAL SOFTWARE IN HIGHER EDUCATION},
booktitle={Proceedings of WEBIST 2006 - Second International Conference on Web Information Systems and Technologies - Volume 2: WEBIST,},
year={2006},
pages={21-28},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0001256100210028},
isbn={978-972-8865-47-4},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of WEBIST 2006 - Second International Conference on Web Information Systems and Technologies - Volume 2: WEBIST,
TI - PITFALLS AND POTENTIALS OF SOCIAL SOFTWARE IN HIGHER EDUCATION
SN - 978-972-8865-47-4
AU - Puntschart I.
AU - Tochtermann K.
AU - Dösinger G.
PY - 2006
SP - 21
EP - 28
DO - 10.5220/0001256100210028