ORGANISATIONAL LEARNING AND HEIDEGGER’S ONTOLOGY - Does Philosophy Matter for Information Systems Design?

Angela Lacerda Nobre

Abstract

Organisational learning has gained wide recognition both among academics and practitioners. The need to focus on core knowledge processes and to consider both their tacit and their explicit dimensions has led organisations to value the contributions from socio-philosophy. Heidegger’ ontology, in particular, is highly relevant because it radically shifts the attention towards the situated and discursive dimensions of organisational social contexts. This attention, focused on social practices and on language use, has critical implications to information systems design because it addresses the mechanisms through which work systems and their supporting technology help to determine ways of being.

References

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Lacerda Nobre A. (2007). ORGANISATIONAL LEARNING AND HEIDEGGER’S ONTOLOGY - Does Philosophy Matter for Information Systems Design? . In Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 3: ICEIS, ISBN 978-972-8865-90-0, pages 498-501. DOI: 10.5220/0002391704980501


in Bibtex Style

@conference{iceis07,
author={Angela Lacerda Nobre},
title={ORGANISATIONAL LEARNING AND HEIDEGGER’S ONTOLOGY - Does Philosophy Matter for Information Systems Design?},
booktitle={Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 3: ICEIS,},
year={2007},
pages={498-501},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0002391704980501},
isbn={978-972-8865-90-0},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 3: ICEIS,
TI - ORGANISATIONAL LEARNING AND HEIDEGGER’S ONTOLOGY - Does Philosophy Matter for Information Systems Design?
SN - 978-972-8865-90-0
AU - Lacerda Nobre A.
PY - 2007
SP - 498
EP - 501
DO - 10.5220/0002391704980501