WHAT’S THE BEST ROLE FOR A ROBOT? - Cybernetic Models of Existing and Proposed Human-Robot Interaction Structures

Victoria Groom

Abstract

Robots intended for human-robot interaction are currently designed to fill simple roles, such as task completer or tool. The design emphasis remains on the robot and not the interaction, as designers have failed to recognize the influence of robots on human behavior. Cybernetic models are used to critique existing models and provide revised models of interaction that delineate the paths of social feedback generated by the robot. Proposed robot roles are modeled and evaluated. Features that need to be developed for robots to succeed in these roles are identified and the challenges of developing these features are discussed.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Groom V. (2008). WHAT’S THE BEST ROLE FOR A ROBOT? - Cybernetic Models of Existing and Proposed Human-Robot Interaction Structures . In Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Informatics in Control, Automation and Robotics - Volume 2: ICINCO, ISBN 978-989-8111-31-9, pages 323-328. DOI: 10.5220/0001507103230328


in Bibtex Style

@conference{icinco08,
author={Victoria Groom},
title={WHAT’S THE BEST ROLE FOR A ROBOT? - Cybernetic Models of Existing and Proposed Human-Robot Interaction Structures},
booktitle={Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Informatics in Control, Automation and Robotics - Volume 2: ICINCO,},
year={2008},
pages={323-328},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0001507103230328},
isbn={978-989-8111-31-9},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Informatics in Control, Automation and Robotics - Volume 2: ICINCO,
TI - WHAT’S THE BEST ROLE FOR A ROBOT? - Cybernetic Models of Existing and Proposed Human-Robot Interaction Structures
SN - 978-989-8111-31-9
AU - Groom V.
PY - 2008
SP - 323
EP - 328
DO - 10.5220/0001507103230328