Activity Theory as an Interpretive Framework for HR Systems: Some Insights and Potential Contributions

Mohamed Omar Mohamud

Abstract

Human Resource (HR) systems are increasingly being focused on as subjects of study by researchers and analysts alike. However, there are persistent themes that resonate among existing HR studies, revolving around the disharmonies between wider organisational strategies and individual-oriented HR systems, as well as the quest for stability in an environment of prevalent ambiguities. The study uses activity theory as interpretive and investigative framework to bridge the gaps in the way HR systems are analysed. A number of theoretical constructs that could potentially complement mainstream approaches are suggested and explained. These include the idea that HR systems could be viewed as object-oriented activity systems that consist of complex relationships and connections, and an acknowledgement that tensions and contradictions are integral part of human activities which ought to be seen as opportunities for development and change.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Omar Mohamud M. (2008). Activity Theory as an Interpretive Framework for HR Systems: Some Insights and Potential Contributions . In Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on Human Resource Information Systems - Volume 1: HRIS, (ICEIS 2008) ISBN 978-989-8111-47-0, pages 136-146. DOI: 10.5220/0001743501360146


in Bibtex Style

@conference{hris08,
author={Mohamed Omar Mohamud},
title={Activity Theory as an Interpretive Framework for HR Systems: Some Insights and Potential Contributions},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on Human Resource Information Systems - Volume 1: HRIS, (ICEIS 2008)},
year={2008},
pages={136-146},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0001743501360146},
isbn={978-989-8111-47-0},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on Human Resource Information Systems - Volume 1: HRIS, (ICEIS 2008)
TI - Activity Theory as an Interpretive Framework for HR Systems: Some Insights and Potential Contributions
SN - 978-989-8111-47-0
AU - Omar Mohamud M.
PY - 2008
SP - 136
EP - 146
DO - 10.5220/0001743501360146