THE INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL NETWORKS ON KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT FOR INNOVATION IN LIFE-SCIENCE DISCOVERY NETWORKS

Claire Gubbins, Lawrence Dooley

Abstract

The competitiveness and sustainability of a modern organisation depends on its ability to innovate. It is increasingly accepted that knowledge, skills and competencies are the key drivers of innovation. Access to the latest information can provide critical competitive edge for organisations’ innovation efforts. Social networks are found to promote organisational and collective learning and are a significant source of knowledge which subsequently leads to innovation. The paper aims to introduce social network analysis as a useful methodology for organisations and managers to use to analyse how collaboration for knowledge management for innovation efforts is accomplished. Social network analysis (SNA) facilitates analysis of relationships among actors in a network. It describes a number of social network factors that are useful in analysing overall network structures, network content, the characteristics of interactions and identifying the impact they have on knowledge management for innovation efforts. This will illuminate the mechanisms through which collaboration for innovation is accomplished. Three case studies of a knowledge network within the life sciences sector are utilised to conduct an exploration into how knowledge is managed through social networks for innovation.

References

  1. Burt, R. S. (1992). Structural Holes: The social structure of competition (1 ed.). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  2. Cross & Parker (2004), The Hidden Power of Social Networks: Understanding How Work Really Gets Done in Organisations, Harvard Business School Press, Boston, MA.
  3. Dooley, L., Kirk, R. D. and Philpott, K. (2010). Managing collaboration within Knowledge Discovery Networks. R&D Management Conference proceedings, Manchester 2010.
  4. Donaldson B. and O'Toole, T. (2007). Strategic Market Relationships: From Strategy to Implementation, John Wiley & Sons.
  5. Farid-Foad, A., R. El-Sharkawy and L. K. Austin (1993). Managing for Creativity and Innovation in A/E/C Organisations, Journal of Management in Engineering : American Society of Civil Engineers, Vol. 9, No. 4.
  6. Granovetter, M. S. (1973). The Strength of Weak Ties. American Journal of Sociology, 78(6), 1360-1380.
  7. Hansen, M. T. (1999), “The Search-Transfer Problem: The Role of Weak Ties in Sharing Knowledge across Organization Subunits”, Administrative Science Quarterly, vol. 44, (1), pp. 82-111.
  8. Hargadon, A. B. (2002). Knowledge brokering: A network perspective on learning and innovation, Research in Organisational Behavior, B. Straw and R. Kramer (Eds), JAI Press, 21: pp. 41-85
  9. McKenzie, J. & Van Winkelen, C. (2004), Understanding the Knowledgeable Organization: Nurturing Knowledge Competence, Thomson: London.
  10. Morton, S. C., Dainty, A. R. J., Burns, N. D., Brookes, N. J. & Backhouse, C. J. (2006). Managing relationships to improve performance: a case study in the global aerospace industry. International Journal of Production Research, 44:16, 3227-3241.
  11. Neilson, G., Gulati, R. & Kletter, D. (2004) Organizing for success in the 21st century. Booz Allen HamiltonKellogg School of Management, Fortune 1000 survey findings. Available at: http://www.boozallen.com/bahng/SilverDemo.
  12. O'Sullivan D & Dooley, L., (2008) Applying Innovation; Sage Publications
  13. Powell, W., Koput, K. W. and Smith-Doerr, L. (1996). Inter-organizational collaboration and the locus of innovation: Networks of learning in biotechnology, Administrative Science Quarterly, 41, pp. 116-145.
  14. Roberts, E. M, (1988). Managing invention and innovation. Research-Technology Management, 31(1), 11-29.
  15. Rothwell, P. A. (1992). Successful industrial innovation: critical factors for the 1990s, R&D Management, Vol. 22 (3), pp. 221 - 240
  16. Storberg-Walker, J. & Gubbins, C. (2007). Social Networks as a Conceptual and Empirical Tool to Understand and “Do” HRD, Advances in Developing Human Resources, 9, 3.
  17. Tidd, J., Bessant, J. and Pavitt, K. (2005), Managing Innovation: Integrating Technological, Market and Organisational Change, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester.
  18. Tranfield, D., Young, M., Partington, D., Bessant, J., & Sapsed, J. (2006), Knowledge management routines for innovation projects: developing a hierarchical process model. In Tidd, J. (2. ed.). Knowledge Management to Strategic Competence, Imperial College Press: London. pp. 126-149.
  19. Trott, P., (2008) Innovation Management and New Product Development. 4th ed: Prentice-Hall
  20. Von Stamm, B., (2003) Managing Innovation, Design and Creativity: Wiley
  21. Zander, U. and Kogut, B. (1995) Knowledge and the speed of transfer and imitation of organisational capabilities: An empirical test. Organizational Science. 6: pp76-92
Download


Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Gubbins C. and Dooley L. (2010). THE INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL NETWORKS ON KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT FOR INNOVATION IN LIFE-SCIENCE DISCOVERY NETWORKS . In Proceedings of the International Conference on Knowledge Management and Information Sharing - Volume 1: KMIS, (IC3K 2010) ISBN 978-989-8425-30-0, pages 182-188. DOI: 10.5220/0003075001820188


in Bibtex Style

@conference{kmis10,
author={Claire Gubbins and Lawrence Dooley},
title={THE INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL NETWORKS ON KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT FOR INNOVATION IN LIFE-SCIENCE DISCOVERY NETWORKS},
booktitle={Proceedings of the International Conference on Knowledge Management and Information Sharing - Volume 1: KMIS, (IC3K 2010)},
year={2010},
pages={182-188},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0003075001820188},
isbn={978-989-8425-30-0},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the International Conference on Knowledge Management and Information Sharing - Volume 1: KMIS, (IC3K 2010)
TI - THE INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL NETWORKS ON KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT FOR INNOVATION IN LIFE-SCIENCE DISCOVERY NETWORKS
SN - 978-989-8425-30-0
AU - Gubbins C.
AU - Dooley L.
PY - 2010
SP - 182
EP - 188
DO - 10.5220/0003075001820188