A FRAMEWORK FOR REPRESENTING AND PROCESSING ARBITRARY MATHEMATICS

Arnold Neumaier, Peter Schodl

Abstract

While mathematicians already benefit from the computer as regards numerical problems, visualization, symbolic manipulation, typesetting, etc., there is no common facility to store and process information, and mathematicians usually have to communicate the same mathematical content multiple times to the computer. We are in the process of creating and implementing a framework that is capable of representing and interfacing optimization problems, and we argue that this framework can be used to represent arbitrary mathematics and contribute towards a universal mathematical database.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Neumaier A. and Schodl P. (2010). A FRAMEWORK FOR REPRESENTING AND PROCESSING ARBITRARY MATHEMATICS . In Proceedings of the International Conference on Knowledge Engineering and Ontology Development - Volume 1: KEOD, (IC3K 2010) ISBN 978-989-8425-29-4, pages 476-479. DOI: 10.5220/0003119104760479


in Bibtex Style

@conference{keod10,
author={Arnold Neumaier and Peter Schodl},
title={A FRAMEWORK FOR REPRESENTING AND PROCESSING ARBITRARY MATHEMATICS},
booktitle={Proceedings of the International Conference on Knowledge Engineering and Ontology Development - Volume 1: KEOD, (IC3K 2010)},
year={2010},
pages={476-479},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0003119104760479},
isbn={978-989-8425-29-4},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the International Conference on Knowledge Engineering and Ontology Development - Volume 1: KEOD, (IC3K 2010)
TI - A FRAMEWORK FOR REPRESENTING AND PROCESSING ARBITRARY MATHEMATICS
SN - 978-989-8425-29-4
AU - Neumaier A.
AU - Schodl P.
PY - 2010
SP - 476
EP - 479
DO - 10.5220/0003119104760479