SEAMLESS LEARNING IN SERIOUS GAMES - How to Improve Seamless Learning-content Integration in Serious Games

Viktor Wendel, Stefan Göbel, Ralf Steinmetz

Abstract

Although the concept of Serious Games and Digital Educational Games (DEGs) is not new, many of those are either not accepted as real games by players due to a lack of fun or they are not accepted by professionals - such as teachers or trainers - as a true alternative to traditional forms of learning due to insufficient didactic concepts and learning efficiency. A major reason for this is one of the grand challenges in Serious Games: Assessment integration, i.e. seamless integration of learning content and seamless and non-disruptive evaluation of learning success during play. Based on an analysis of the state of the art, we formulate a list of guiding principles for DEG design. Hereby the aspects of seamless integration of learning content into a game regarding game genre, the proper degree of realism, active and passive game elements, player evaluation and feedback, adaptation and personalization as well as learner types are considered. Furthermore, three awardwinning Serious Games/DEGs are discussed with respect to these guiding principles and underlying methods and concepts for assessment integration are analyzed.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Wendel V., Göbel S. and Steinmetz R. (2011). SEAMLESS LEARNING IN SERIOUS GAMES - How to Improve Seamless Learning-content Integration in Serious Games . In Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU, ISBN 978-989-8425-49-2, pages 219-224. DOI: 10.5220/0003312402190224


in Bibtex Style

@conference{csedu11,
author={Viktor Wendel and Stefan Göbel and Ralf Steinmetz},
title={SEAMLESS LEARNING IN SERIOUS GAMES - How to Improve Seamless Learning-content Integration in Serious Games},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU,},
year={2011},
pages={219-224},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0003312402190224},
isbn={978-989-8425-49-2},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU,
TI - SEAMLESS LEARNING IN SERIOUS GAMES - How to Improve Seamless Learning-content Integration in Serious Games
SN - 978-989-8425-49-2
AU - Wendel V.
AU - Göbel S.
AU - Steinmetz R.
PY - 2011
SP - 219
EP - 224
DO - 10.5220/0003312402190224