A SMALL TOWN’S STREET AS AN EDUCATIONAL PROJECT - A Case Study: Asynchronus Interdisciplinary Education between a Greek University and Two Secondary Schools

Xesternou Maria, Melina Iliopoulou, Despina Ino Pagoni

Abstract

The increasing demand of distance education and the growing degree of diversity of learner groups have created the practice of e-learning which takes place in virtual learning environments (VLEs). The present case study has joined a Greek university of periphery (University of Peloponnese, School of philology) with two private secondary schools (Psychico College of the Hellenic American Educational Foundation and Geitonas School) of the capital. The cognitive material is the history and profile of a commercial street in a historic town of Peloponnese (Kalamata): Aristomenous street. A group of secondary students attending courses of mathematics or sociology do team work in order to visualize the complete “image” of the street, its’ shops and houses, the architecture of the buildings serving the commercial needs in the 19th century, their cultural remainings, etc. A group of university students, undertaking their role of future educators, collaborate with them as tutors in order to provide material from their inhabited town, Kalamata, to search and propose references, to give advice, etc. The project has adopted several pedagogical theories of education and respects late tendencies in ICT educational practice. It is questioned how students of different ages and educational levels can work together in order to find more meaningful and efficient type of learning. The nature of their communication, their roles during the learning process and their commitment are being studied. A pilot project is being discussed during the academic year 2010-2011 before launching the application of the project for the three following academic years; a mixed evaluation method is planned.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Maria X., Iliopoulou M. and Ino Pagoni D. (2011). A SMALL TOWN’S STREET AS AN EDUCATIONAL PROJECT - A Case Study: Asynchronus Interdisciplinary Education between a Greek University and Two Secondary Schools . In Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU, ISBN 978-989-8425-49-2, pages 291-296. DOI: 10.5220/0003344302910296


in Bibtex Style

@conference{csedu11,
author={Xesternou Maria and Melina Iliopoulou and Despina Ino Pagoni},
title={A SMALL TOWN’S STREET AS AN EDUCATIONAL PROJECT - A Case Study: Asynchronus Interdisciplinary Education between a Greek University and Two Secondary Schools},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU,},
year={2011},
pages={291-296},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0003344302910296},
isbn={978-989-8425-49-2},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU,
TI - A SMALL TOWN’S STREET AS AN EDUCATIONAL PROJECT - A Case Study: Asynchronus Interdisciplinary Education between a Greek University and Two Secondary Schools
SN - 978-989-8425-49-2
AU - Maria X.
AU - Iliopoulou M.
AU - Ino Pagoni D.
PY - 2011
SP - 291
EP - 296
DO - 10.5220/0003344302910296