DYNAMIC LANGUAGES AS MODELING NOTATIONS IN MODEL DRIVEN ENGINEERING

Xiaoping Jia, Chris Jones

Abstract

There has been a gradual but steady convergence of dynamic programming languages with modeling languages. Modern dynamic languages such as Groovy and Ruby provide for the creation of domain-specific languages that can provide a level of abstraction comparable to that of modeling languages such as UML. This convergence makes dynamic languages suitable as modeling languages but with benefits that traditional modeling languages do not provide. One area that can benefit from this convergence is model driven engineering. By using a dynamic language as an augmentation to MDE’s traditional UML notation, it is possible to create models that are executable, exhibit flexible type checking, and which provide a smaller cognitive gap between business users, modelers and developers.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Jia X. and Jones C. (2011). DYNAMIC LANGUAGES AS MODELING NOTATIONS IN MODEL DRIVEN ENGINEERING . In Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Software and Database Technologies - Volume 2: ICSOFT, ISBN 978-989-8425-77-5, pages 220-225. DOI: 10.5220/0003607102200225


in Bibtex Style

@conference{icsoft11,
author={Xiaoping Jia and Chris Jones},
title={DYNAMIC LANGUAGES AS MODELING NOTATIONS IN MODEL DRIVEN ENGINEERING},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Software and Database Technologies - Volume 2: ICSOFT,},
year={2011},
pages={220-225},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0003607102200225},
isbn={978-989-8425-77-5},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Software and Database Technologies - Volume 2: ICSOFT,
TI - DYNAMIC LANGUAGES AS MODELING NOTATIONS IN MODEL DRIVEN ENGINEERING
SN - 978-989-8425-77-5
AU - Jia X.
AU - Jones C.
PY - 2011
SP - 220
EP - 225
DO - 10.5220/0003607102200225