IMPACT OF BLOCKING WHEN CUSTOMERS OF DIFFERENT CLASSES ARE ACCOMMODATED IN ONE COMMON QUEUE

Herwig Bruneel, Willem Mélange, Bart Steyaert, Dieter Claeys, Joris Walraevens

Abstract

In this paper, situations are investigated where customers requiring different types of service, each provided by distinct servers, are accommodated in one common queue. In such scenarios, customers of one class (i.e., requiring a given type of service) may be hindered (“blocked”) by customers of other classes. For instance, if a road or a highway is split in two or more subroads leading to different destinations, cars on that road heading for destination A may be hindered or even blocked by cars heading for destination B, even when the subroad leading to destination A is free, simply because they have to queue in first-come-first-served (FCFS) order on the main road. The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of blocking. We therefore develop a discrete-time queueing model and establish performance measures related to the number of waiting customers. Based on the obtained results, we demonstrate that clustering of arrivals according to class pronounces the negative impact of blocking. We believe that the impact of class clustering on blocking has been largely overlooked in the regular operations research and queueing literature.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Bruneel H., Mélange W., Steyaert B., Claeys D. and Walraevens J. (2012). IMPACT OF BLOCKING WHEN CUSTOMERS OF DIFFERENT CLASSES ARE ACCOMMODATED IN ONE COMMON QUEUE . In Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Operations Research and Enterprise Systems - Volume 1: ICORES, ISBN 978-989-8425-97-3, pages 31-38. DOI: 10.5220/0003735500310038


in Bibtex Style

@conference{icores12,
author={Herwig Bruneel and Willem Mélange and Bart Steyaert and Dieter Claeys and Joris Walraevens},
title={IMPACT OF BLOCKING WHEN CUSTOMERS OF DIFFERENT CLASSES ARE ACCOMMODATED IN ONE COMMON QUEUE},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Operations Research and Enterprise Systems - Volume 1: ICORES,},
year={2012},
pages={31-38},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0003735500310038},
isbn={978-989-8425-97-3},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Operations Research and Enterprise Systems - Volume 1: ICORES,
TI - IMPACT OF BLOCKING WHEN CUSTOMERS OF DIFFERENT CLASSES ARE ACCOMMODATED IN ONE COMMON QUEUE
SN - 978-989-8425-97-3
AU - Bruneel H.
AU - Mélange W.
AU - Steyaert B.
AU - Claeys D.
AU - Walraevens J.
PY - 2012
SP - 31
EP - 38
DO - 10.5220/0003735500310038