COMPENSATORY MOVEMENT DETECTION THROUGH INERTIAL SENSOR POSITIONING FOR POST-STROKE REHABILITATION

Carla M. Borges, Claudia Silva, Antonio J. Salazar, Ana S. Silva, Miguel V. Correia, Rubim S. Santos, João P. Vilas-Boas

Abstract

An increasing ageing society and consequently rising number of post-stroke related neurological dysfunction patients are forcing the rehabilitation field to adapt to ever-growing demands. In parallel, an unprecedented number of research efforts and technological solutions meant for human monitoring are continuously influencing traditional methodologies, causing paradigm shifts; extending the therapist patient dynamics. Compensatory movements can be observed in post-stroke patient when performing functional tasks. Although some controversy remains regarding the functional benefits of compensatory movement as a way of accomplish a given task, even in the presence of a motor deficit; studies suggest that such maladaptive strategies may limit the plasticity of the nervous system to enhance neuro-motor recovery. This preliminary study intends to aid in the development of a system for compensatory movement detection in stroke patients through the use of accelerometry data. A post-stroke patients group is presented and discussed, instructed to perform reach and press movements while sensors were positioned at different location on the arm, forearm and trunk, in order to assess sensor positioning influence. Results suggest that P1 is advantageous for compensatory elevation movement detection at the shoulder; P4 seems the most appropriate for detecting the abduction; and P5 presents a reasonable sensitivity for detection of anteriorization and rotation of the trunk.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Borges C., Silva C., J. Salazar A., Silva A., V. Correia M., S. Santos R. and P. Vilas-Boas J. (2012). COMPENSATORY MOVEMENT DETECTION THROUGH INERTIAL SENSOR POSITIONING FOR POST-STROKE REHABILITATION . In Proceedings of the International Conference on Bio-inspired Systems and Signal Processing - Volume 1: BIOSIGNALS, (BIOSTEC 2012) ISBN 978-989-8425-89-8, pages 297-302. DOI: 10.5220/0003798102970302


in Bibtex Style

@conference{biosignals12,
author={Carla M. Borges and Claudia Silva and Antonio J. Salazar and Ana S. Silva and Miguel V. Correia and Rubim S. Santos and João P. Vilas-Boas},
title={COMPENSATORY MOVEMENT DETECTION THROUGH INERTIAL SENSOR POSITIONING FOR POST-STROKE REHABILITATION},
booktitle={Proceedings of the International Conference on Bio-inspired Systems and Signal Processing - Volume 1: BIOSIGNALS, (BIOSTEC 2012)},
year={2012},
pages={297-302},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0003798102970302},
isbn={978-989-8425-89-8},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the International Conference on Bio-inspired Systems and Signal Processing - Volume 1: BIOSIGNALS, (BIOSTEC 2012)
TI - COMPENSATORY MOVEMENT DETECTION THROUGH INERTIAL SENSOR POSITIONING FOR POST-STROKE REHABILITATION
SN - 978-989-8425-89-8
AU - Borges C.
AU - Silva C.
AU - J. Salazar A.
AU - Silva A.
AU - V. Correia M.
AU - S. Santos R.
AU - P. Vilas-Boas J.
PY - 2012
SP - 297
EP - 302
DO - 10.5220/0003798102970302