Design of Human-computer Interfaces in Scheduling Applications

Anna Prenzel, Georg Ringwelski

Abstract

There are many algorithms to solve scheduling problems, but in practice the knowledge of human experts almost always needs to be involved to get satisfiable solutions. In this paper, we describe a set of decision support features that can be used to improve human computer interfaces for scheduling. They facilitate and optimize human decisions at all stages of the scheduling procedure. Based on a study with 35 test subjects and overall 105 hours of usability testing we verify that the use of the features improves both quality and practicability of the produced schedules.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Prenzel A. and Ringwelski G. (2012). Design of Human-computer Interfaces in Scheduling Applications . In Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 1: ICEIS, ISBN 978-989-8565-10-5, pages 219-228. DOI: 10.5220/0003987402190228


in Bibtex Style

@conference{iceis12,
author={Anna Prenzel and Georg Ringwelski},
title={Design of Human-computer Interfaces in Scheduling Applications},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 1: ICEIS,},
year={2012},
pages={219-228},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0003987402190228},
isbn={978-989-8565-10-5},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 1: ICEIS,
TI - Design of Human-computer Interfaces in Scheduling Applications
SN - 978-989-8565-10-5
AU - Prenzel A.
AU - Ringwelski G.
PY - 2012
SP - 219
EP - 228
DO - 10.5220/0003987402190228