Positioning the Normalized Systems Theory in a Design Theory Framework

Philip Huysmans, Gilles Oorts, Peter De Bruyn

Abstract

Several frameworks have been proposed to define design science and design theory over the last decades. For this reason, positioning a research stream within both paradigms has become a difficult exercise. In this paper, the Normalized System (NS) theory is positioned within design science and design theory, in particular the design theory framework formulated by Gregor & Jones (2007). Normalized Systems theory has been proposed as a way to cope with the ever increasingly agile environment to which organizations and their software applications need to adapt. NS achieves this evolvability by articulating theorems that modular structures need to comply with in order to be evolvable. The results of positioning NS within the presented framework for design theories show that NS almost fully incorporates all components of the design theory anatomy. An application of NS theory in other fields is also discussed, which confirms the applicability of the anatomy of Gregor & Jones (2007) within other disciplines. By positioning Normalized System theory within design science and design theory, we also believe to contribute to the definition of both fields in this paper.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Huysmans P., Oorts G. and De Bruyn P. (2012). Positioning the Normalized Systems Theory in a Design Theory Framework . In Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Business Modeling and Software Design - Volume 1: BMSD, ISBN 978-989-8565-26-6, pages 33-42. DOI: 10.5220/0004460900330042


in Bibtex Style

@conference{bmsd12,
author={Philip Huysmans and Gilles Oorts and Peter De Bruyn},
title={Positioning the Normalized Systems Theory in a Design Theory Framework},
booktitle={Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Business Modeling and Software Design - Volume 1: BMSD,},
year={2012},
pages={33-42},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0004460900330042},
isbn={978-989-8565-26-6},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Business Modeling and Software Design - Volume 1: BMSD,
TI - Positioning the Normalized Systems Theory in a Design Theory Framework
SN - 978-989-8565-26-6
AU - Huysmans P.
AU - Oorts G.
AU - De Bruyn P.
PY - 2012
SP - 33
EP - 42
DO - 10.5220/0004460900330042