Making Task Models and Dialog Graphs Suitable for Generating Assistive and Adaptable User Interfaces for Smart Environments

Michael Zaki, Peter Forbrig

Abstract

Nowadays smart environments are gaining special attention among the various ubiquitous computing environment types. The main tenet of a given smart environment is to deliver proper assistance to the resident users while performing their daily life tasks. The environment aims to implicitly infer the user’s intention and based on that information, it offers the optimal feasible assistance which helps the user performing his/her task. Task models seem to be a convenient starting point for developing applications for those environments, as they give the developer the opportunity to focus on the user tasks to be assisted. Already existing approaches offer solutions to make the transition between task models and the final user interfaces. However, smart environments are dynamic environments in which the inclusion of new user or device types is probable. Consequently, an optimal application to be operated in such an environment is required to consider the extensibility aspect within its design. Additionally, the implicit interaction technique has to be taken into account. Thus, in this paper we provide an attempt to include the implicit interaction paradigm within the design of our application as well as to ensure the extensibility needed to encounter the variation of the surrounding environmental settings.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Zaki M. and Forbrig P. (2013). Making Task Models and Dialog Graphs Suitable for Generating Assistive and Adaptable User Interfaces for Smart Environments . In Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Pervasive Embedded Computing and Communication Systems - Volume 1: PECCS, ISBN 978-989-8565-43-3, pages 66-75. DOI: 10.5220/0004315100660075


in Bibtex Style

@conference{peccs13,
author={Michael Zaki and Peter Forbrig},
title={Making Task Models and Dialog Graphs Suitable for Generating Assistive and Adaptable User Interfaces for Smart Environments},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Pervasive Embedded Computing and Communication Systems - Volume 1: PECCS,},
year={2013},
pages={66-75},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0004315100660075},
isbn={978-989-8565-43-3},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Pervasive Embedded Computing and Communication Systems - Volume 1: PECCS,
TI - Making Task Models and Dialog Graphs Suitable for Generating Assistive and Adaptable User Interfaces for Smart Environments
SN - 978-989-8565-43-3
AU - Zaki M.
AU - Forbrig P.
PY - 2013
SP - 66
EP - 75
DO - 10.5220/0004315100660075