Understanding the Challenges of Introducing Self-driven Blended Learning in a Restrictive Ecosystem - Step 1 for Change Management: Understanding Student Motivation

Kay Berkling, Armin Zundel

Abstract

This paper describes the implementation of a prototype for blended learning in a Software Engineering course at the Cooperative State University Baden-Württemberg in Karlsruhe. The University has certain particularities that distinguish it from other Universities because students alternate quarters between study and work. Thus, students receive a salary during their three years towards earning a Bachelor Degree and attendance is mandatory. In cohorts, around 30 students spend an average day with at least 5 hours of frontal lecture in the same classroom. Software Engineering takes up about 5 hours a week of in-class time in their second year of study and is the first course students have seen with a self-driven, blended learning format. The paper describes the set-up of the learning environment based on known research results of motivational factors. Based on an exploratory survey of 59 students, these motivation factors are compared to students’ motivations and their realizations in traditional and self-driven lecture format. Answers revealed that change presents a major challenge for most students and identifies the need for explicit habit building, change management and improved serving of students’ basic needs in a grade-based ecosystem.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Berkling K. and Zundel A. (2013). Understanding the Challenges of Introducing Self-driven Blended Learning in a Restrictive Ecosystem - Step 1 for Change Management: Understanding Student Motivation . In Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU, ISBN 978-989-8565-53-2, pages 311-320. DOI: 10.5220/0004381403110320


in Bibtex Style

@conference{csedu13,
author={Kay Berkling and Armin Zundel},
title={Understanding the Challenges of Introducing Self-driven Blended Learning in a Restrictive Ecosystem - Step 1 for Change Management: Understanding Student Motivation},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU,},
year={2013},
pages={311-320},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0004381403110320},
isbn={978-989-8565-53-2},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU,
TI - Understanding the Challenges of Introducing Self-driven Blended Learning in a Restrictive Ecosystem - Step 1 for Change Management: Understanding Student Motivation
SN - 978-989-8565-53-2
AU - Berkling K.
AU - Zundel A.
PY - 2013
SP - 311
EP - 320
DO - 10.5220/0004381403110320