Learning Strategy and Students’ Perception of Different Learning Options in a Blended Learning Environment - A Case Study of a First Year Engineering Course

B. Schmidt

Abstract

This case study presents a teaching strategy for an engineering dynamics course using a range of different learning options supporting different learning styles. The teaching strategy was implemented in a blended learning environment by combining traditional lectures with online resources. A set of questionnaire was given to evaluate the students’ perception of the different learning options. The study shows that the students found online pencasts very useful as a means to increase the outcome of studying a traditional textbook. In addition, the implementation of an electronic audience response system to enhance active learning by peer instruction in combination with traditional lecturing was highly appreciated by the students. Finally, the study indicates that according to the students the proposed teaching strategy leads to increased motivation and engagement in their study.

References

  1. Bourne, J., Harris, D. and Mayadas, F., 2005. Online engineering education: learning anywhere, anytime. Journal of Engineering Education, 94 (1), pp. 131-146 Boyle, T., 2005. A dynamic systematic method for developing blended learning. Education, Communication & Information, 5 (3), pp. 221-232.
  2. Brodie, L.M., 2009. eProblem-based learning: problembased learning using virtuel teams, European Journal of Engineering Education, 34 (6), pp. 497-509.
  3. Cortizo, J.L., et al., 2010. Blended learning applied to the study of Mechanical Couplings in engineering. Computers & Education, 54 (4), pp. 1006-1019.
  4. Dzakiria, H., Che, S. M. and Bakar, H. A., 2006. Moving forward with blended learning as a pedagogical alternative to traditional classroom learning, Malaysian Online Journal of Intsructional Technology, 3 (1), pp. 11-18.
  5. El-Zein, A., Langrish, T., Ballam, N., 2009. Blended Teaching and Learning of Computer Programming Skills in Engineering Curricula, Advances in Engineering Education, 1 (3), pp. 1-18.
  6. Fang, N., 2009. Electronic classroom response system for an engineering dynamics course: student satisfaction and learning outcomes. International Journal of Engineering Education, 25 (5), pp. 1059-1067.
  7. Felder, R.M. and Brent, R., 2005. Understanding student differences. Journal of Engineering, 94 (1), pp. 57-72 Fies, C. and Marshall, J., 2006. Classroom response system: a review of the literature. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 15, pp. 101-109.
  8. Fitzpatrick, J., Cronin, K. and Byrne, E., 2010. Is attending lectures still relevant in engineering education?, European Journal of Engineering Education, 36 (3), pp. 301-312.
  9. Graham, C.R, Allen, S. and Ure, D., 2005. Benefits and challenges of blended learning environments. Encyclopedia of information science and technology, M. Khosrow-Pour, ed., Hershey, PA: Idea Group, pp. 263-259.
  10. Granic, A., Mifsud, C. and Cukusic, M., 2009. Design, implementation and validation of a Europe-wide pedagogical framework for e-learning. Computers & Education, 53 (4), pp. 1052-1081.
  11. Groen, L. and Carmody, G., 2005. Blended learning in a first year mathematics subject. Proceedings of UniServe Science Blended Learning Symposium, pp. 50-55.
  12. Kerres, M., de Witt, C., 2003. A didactical framework for the design of blended learning arrangements. Journal of Educational Media, 28 (2-3), pp. 101-113.
  13. Limniou, M. and Smith, M., 2010. Teachers' and students' perspectives on teaching and learning through virtual learning environments, European Journal of Engineering Education, 35 (6), pp. 645-653.
  14. Lux, J.R. and Davidson, B.D., 2003. Guidelines for the development of computer-based instruction modules for science and engineering. Educational Technology & Society, 6 (4), pp. 124-133.
  15. Marino, T.A., 2000. Learning online: a view from both sides. The National Teaching & Learning Forum, 9 (4), pp. 4-6.
  16. Markvorsen, S. and Schmidt, K., 2012. Online Mathematics Education - E-Math for First Year Engineering Students. International Conference on Computer Supported Education (CSEDU 2012), Porto, Portugal.
  17. Martínez-Caro, E. and Campuzano-Bolarín, F., 2011. Factors affecting students' satisfaction in engineering disciplines: traditional vs. blended approaches. European Journal of Engineering Education, 36 (5), pp. 473-483.
  18. Mazur, E., 1997. Peer-Instruction: A user's manual, Upper Saddle River, NJ, Prentice Hall
  19. Meriam, J.L. and Craige, L.G., 2008. Engineering Mechanics, Dynamics, 6.th edn., Hoboken, NJ: Wiley & Sons.
  20. Moebs, S., Weibelzahl, S., 2006. Towards a good mix in blended learning for small and medium sized enterprises - Outline of a Delphi Study. Proceedings of the Workshop on Blended Learning and SMEs, 1st European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning Crete, Greece.
  21. Nagy-Shadman, E. and Desrochers, C., 2008. Student response technology: empirically grounded or just a gimmick? International Journal of Science Education, 30 , pp. 2023-2066.
  22. Oliver, M. and Trigwel, K. (2005). Can 'Blended Learning' be redeemed? E-learning, 2 (1), pp. 17-26 Osguthorpe, R.T. and Graham, C.R., 2003. Blended learning environments: definitions and directions. The Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 4 (3), pp. 227-233.
  23. Peercy, P.S. and Cramer, S.M, 2011. Redefining Quality in Engineering Education Through Hybrid Instruction. Journal of Engineering Education, 100 (4), pp. 625- 629.
  24. Schmidt, B., 2011. Teaching engineering dynamics by use of peer instruction supported by an audience response system, European Journal of Engineering Education, 36 (5), pp. 413-423.
  25. Schmidt, B., 2012. Skip lecturing - Let the students talk!, Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Engineering and Technology Education (INTERTECH 2012), ed. by Claudio da Rocha Brito and Melany M. Ciampi, ISBN 978-85-89120-89-0.
  26. Wan Ahmad, W.F., Shafie, A., Janier, J.B., 2008, Students' perceptions towards blended learning in teaching and learning mathematics: Application of integration, Proccedings of the 13th Asian technology Conference in Mathematics.
Download


Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Schmidt B. (2013). Learning Strategy and Students’ Perception of Different Learning Options in a Blended Learning Environment - A Case Study of a First Year Engineering Course . In Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU, ISBN 978-989-8565-53-2, pages 321-330. DOI: 10.5220/0004382003210330


in Bibtex Style

@conference{csedu13,
author={B. Schmidt},
title={Learning Strategy and Students’ Perception of Different Learning Options in a Blended Learning Environment - A Case Study of a First Year Engineering Course},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU,},
year={2013},
pages={321-330},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0004382003210330},
isbn={978-989-8565-53-2},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU,
TI - Learning Strategy and Students’ Perception of Different Learning Options in a Blended Learning Environment - A Case Study of a First Year Engineering Course
SN - 978-989-8565-53-2
AU - Schmidt B.
PY - 2013
SP - 321
EP - 330
DO - 10.5220/0004382003210330