Videogames in Education - Comparing Students’, Student Teachers’ and Master Teachers Opinions and Experiences

David Kaufman

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare secondary students’ experiences and opinions about videogames and their use in education with those of student and experienced master teachers selected by a university to serve as teacher educators. The results of this study demonstrated that a significant majority of secondary school students and student teachers played videogames, compared to a significant majority of experienced master teachers who did not play them. A majority of secondary students and student teachers thought it was a good idea to use videogames to help teach in secondary education, compared to a majority of experienced teachers who did not think this was a good idea. However, a majority of respondents from all three groups thought that videogames could add educational value to the secondary curriculum. There were significant differences for all three participant groups between those who played videogames versus those who did not.

References

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Kaufman D. (2013). Videogames in Education - Comparing Students’, Student Teachers’ and Master Teachers Opinions and Experiences . In Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU, ISBN 978-989-8565-53-2, pages 101-105. DOI: 10.5220/0004383701010105


in Bibtex Style

@conference{csedu13,
author={David Kaufman},
title={Videogames in Education - Comparing Students’, Student Teachers’ and Master Teachers Opinions and Experiences},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU,},
year={2013},
pages={101-105},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0004383701010105},
isbn={978-989-8565-53-2},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU,
TI - Videogames in Education - Comparing Students’, Student Teachers’ and Master Teachers Opinions and Experiences
SN - 978-989-8565-53-2
AU - Kaufman D.
PY - 2013
SP - 101
EP - 105
DO - 10.5220/0004383701010105