CTSiM: A Computational Thinking Environment for Learning Science through Simulation and Modeling

Satabdi Basu, Amanda Dickes, John S. Kinnebrew, Pratim Sengupta, Gautam Biswas

Abstract

Computational thinking (CT) draws on fundamental computer science concepts to formulate and solve problems, design systems, and understand human behavior. CT practices (e.g., problem representation, abstraction, decomposition, simulation, verification, and prediction) are also central to the development of expertise in a variety of STEM disciplines. Exploiting this synergy between CT and STEM disciplines, we have developed CTSiM, a cross-domain, scaffolded, visual-programming and agent-based learning environment for middle school science. We present and justify the CTSiM architecture and its implementation. To identify challenges and scaffolding needs in learning with CTSiM, we present a case study describing the challenges that a high- and a low-achieving student faced while working on kinematics and ecology units using CTSiM. Decreases in the number of challenges for both students over sequences of related activities illustrate the combined effectiveness of our approach. Further, the specific challenges and scaffolds identified suggest the design of an adaptive scaffolding framework to help students develop a synergistic understanding of CT and science concepts.

References

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Basu S., Dickes A., S. Kinnebrew J., Sengupta P. and Biswas G. (2013). CTSiM: A Computational Thinking Environment for Learning Science through Simulation and Modeling . In Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU, ISBN 978-989-8565-53-2, pages 369-378. DOI: 10.5220/0004390103690378


in Bibtex Style

@conference{csedu13,
author={Satabdi Basu and Amanda Dickes and John S. Kinnebrew and Pratim Sengupta and Gautam Biswas},
title={CTSiM: A Computational Thinking Environment for Learning Science through Simulation and Modeling},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU,},
year={2013},
pages={369-378},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0004390103690378},
isbn={978-989-8565-53-2},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU,
TI - CTSiM: A Computational Thinking Environment for Learning Science through Simulation and Modeling
SN - 978-989-8565-53-2
AU - Basu S.
AU - Dickes A.
AU - S. Kinnebrew J.
AU - Sengupta P.
AU - Biswas G.
PY - 2013
SP - 369
EP - 378
DO - 10.5220/0004390103690378