Social Network Modelling for Counter Extremism - Comparing Criminality in Two Activist Networks

Rosemary Penny, Robert Bowles, Noémie Bouhana

Abstract

This paper examines the phenomenon of extreme protest activities in the environmental and animal rights movements, and how their propagation can be simulated through the construction of agent-based models. It uses criminological theory to examine what factors cause a propensity for violent action to spread across social networks, and uses this as the basis for constructing agent-based models of the activist networks. The differences in the results emerging from the models enable inferences to be made regarding which elements in their construction may cause the differences. Modifying the models to explore how these differences in construction affect the outputs from the models enables us to further understand which real-world factors may contribute to differences in the spread of criminality through the social networks of activists.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Penny R., Bowles R. and Bouhana N. (2013). Social Network Modelling for Counter Extremism - Comparing Criminality in Two Activist Networks . In Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Simulation and Modeling Methodologies, Technologies and Applications - Volume 1: SIMULTECH, ISBN 978-989-8565-69-3, pages 382-388. DOI: 10.5220/0004586403820388


in Bibtex Style

@conference{simultech13,
author={Rosemary Penny and Robert Bowles and Noémie Bouhana},
title={Social Network Modelling for Counter Extremism - Comparing Criminality in Two Activist Networks},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Simulation and Modeling Methodologies, Technologies and Applications - Volume 1: SIMULTECH,},
year={2013},
pages={382-388},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0004586403820388},
isbn={978-989-8565-69-3},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Simulation and Modeling Methodologies, Technologies and Applications - Volume 1: SIMULTECH,
TI - Social Network Modelling for Counter Extremism - Comparing Criminality in Two Activist Networks
SN - 978-989-8565-69-3
AU - Penny R.
AU - Bowles R.
AU - Bouhana N.
PY - 2013
SP - 382
EP - 388
DO - 10.5220/0004586403820388