Educational Games and Simulations at School: Experimental Comparison with Classic Teaching Methods and Requirements of Successful Implementation into School Environment and Curricula

Michaela Buchtová, Vít Šisler, Cyril Brom

Abstract

Digital game-based learning is increasingly penetrating formal schooling system; however, it is still largely unknown which game elements (if any) have the most influential effect on learning. Based on qualitative exploratory study, we present outcomes suggesting that real-world grounding, complex systems/processes simulation and teacher’s attitude, are crucial elements for increasing students’ learning engagement and knowledge acquisition. The study stems from focus group discussions conducted as part of a complex experiment taking place at three high-schools in the Czech Republic in 2011 (N=64; M=32, F=32). Additional data were obtained from in-depth interviews with 8 teachers (M=5, F=3) who used at least one game within their classwork. The exploratory study utilized three educational games: Orbis Pictus Bestialis (animal training); Bird Breeder (genetics heredity); Europe 2045 (EU political, economic, and social is-sues). The study has been conducted within a research project focusing on devel-oping a complex educational game Czechoslovakia 38-89 (contemporary Czech history).

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Buchtová M., Šisler V. and Brom C. (2013). Educational Games and Simulations at School: Experimental Comparison with Classic Teaching Methods and Requirements of Successful Implementation into School Environment and Curricula . In Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on Interaction Design in Educational Environments - Volume 1: IDEE, (ICEIS 2013) ISBN 978-989-8565-65-5, pages 125-132. DOI: 10.5220/0004597301250132


in Bibtex Style

@conference{idee13,
author={Michaela Buchtová and Vít Šisler and Cyril Brom},
title={Educational Games and Simulations at School: Experimental Comparison with Classic Teaching Methods and Requirements of Successful Implementation into School Environment and Curricula},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on Interaction Design in Educational Environments - Volume 1: IDEE, (ICEIS 2013)},
year={2013},
pages={125-132},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0004597301250132},
isbn={978-989-8565-65-5},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on Interaction Design in Educational Environments - Volume 1: IDEE, (ICEIS 2013)
TI - Educational Games and Simulations at School: Experimental Comparison with Classic Teaching Methods and Requirements of Successful Implementation into School Environment and Curricula
SN - 978-989-8565-65-5
AU - Buchtová M.
AU - Šisler V.
AU - Brom C.
PY - 2013
SP - 125
EP - 132
DO - 10.5220/0004597301250132