An Analysis of Multi-disciplinary & Inter-agency Collaboration Process - Case Study of a Japanese Community Care Access Center

Miki Saijo, Tsutomu Suzuki, Makiko Watanabe, Shishin Kawamoto

Abstract

This study examines the process of collaboration between multi-disciplinary agencies at a Community Care Access Center (CCAC) for elderly care. Using the KJ method, also known as an “affinity diagram”, in two group meetings (before and after CCAC establishment) with practitioners and administrators from 6 agencies in the city of Kakegawa, Japan, 521 comments by agencies (214 from a meeting in 2010 and 307 from a meeting in 2012) were coded into 36 categories. In comparing the comments from the two meetings, the portion of negative comments regarding organization management decreased, while comments on the shared problems of the CCAC, such as difficult cases, user support, effectiveness, and information sharing increased. A multiple correspondence analysis indicated that the 6 agencies shared a greater awareness of issues after the establishment of the CCAC, but the problems pointed out by the agency with nurses providing in-home medical care differed from those of the other agencies. From this, it has become apparent that group meetings and comments analysis before and after launching a CCAC could illustrate the process of multi-disciplinary and inter-agency collaboration.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Saijo M., Suzuki T., Watanabe M. and Kawamoto S. (2013). An Analysis of Multi-disciplinary & Inter-agency Collaboration Process - Case Study of a Japanese Community Care Access Center . In Proceedings of the International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Information Retrieval and the International Conference on Knowledge Management and Information Sharing - Volume 1: KMIS, (IC3K 2013) ISBN 978-989-8565-75-4, pages 470-475. DOI: 10.5220/0004624604700475


in Bibtex Style

@conference{kmis13,
author={Miki Saijo and Tsutomu Suzuki and Makiko Watanabe and Shishin Kawamoto},
title={An Analysis of Multi-disciplinary & Inter-agency Collaboration Process - Case Study of a Japanese Community Care Access Center},
booktitle={Proceedings of the International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Information Retrieval and the International Conference on Knowledge Management and Information Sharing - Volume 1: KMIS, (IC3K 2013)},
year={2013},
pages={470-475},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0004624604700475},
isbn={978-989-8565-75-4},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Information Retrieval and the International Conference on Knowledge Management and Information Sharing - Volume 1: KMIS, (IC3K 2013)
TI - An Analysis of Multi-disciplinary & Inter-agency Collaboration Process - Case Study of a Japanese Community Care Access Center
SN - 978-989-8565-75-4
AU - Saijo M.
AU - Suzuki T.
AU - Watanabe M.
AU - Kawamoto S.
PY - 2013
SP - 470
EP - 475
DO - 10.5220/0004624604700475