Relationship between Affective Dimensions and Physiological Responses Induced by Emotional Stimuli - Base on Affective Dimensions: Arousal, Valence, Intensity and Approach

Eun-Hye Jang, Mi-Sook Park, Byoung-Jun Park, Sang-Hyeob Kim, Myung-Ae Chung, Jin-Hun Sohn

Abstract

In HCI, emotion recognition using physiological signals have been noticed lately because physiological signals can be simply acquired with some sensors and are less sensitive to social and cultural difference, in particular, there is strong correlation between human emotional states and physiological reactions. We have investigated the relation between affective dimensions, i.e., arousal, valence, intensity and approach, and physiological responses such as electrocardiograph (ECG), electrodermal activity (EDA), skin temperature (SKT), and photoplethysmograph (PPG). Three hundred college students participated in the experiment. To successfully provoke basic emotions (anger, fear, sadness, boredom, interest, surprise, joy, pain, and neutral), emotion-provoking film clips were excerpted for each target emotion. Physiological signals (ECG, EDA, PPG and SKT) as emotional responses were measured during participants’ exposure to emotional stimuli and participants were asked to rate the specific emotions they had experienced on four affective dimensions, valence, arousal, intensity and approach. The result showed that there are correlations between affective dimensions and physiological responses. Contrary to valence and approach, arousal and intensity were positively related to heart rate (HR), skin conductance level (SCL) and skin conductance response (SCR), and showed negative relation to BVP and PTT. Our result suggests an availability of physiological signals for emotion recognition in HCI and can be helpful to provide the basis for the emotion recognition technique in HCI.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Jang E., Park M., Park B., Kim S., Chung M. and Sohn J. (2014). Relationship between Affective Dimensions and Physiological Responses Induced by Emotional Stimuli - Base on Affective Dimensions: Arousal, Valence, Intensity and Approach . In Proceedings of the International Conference on Physiological Computing Systems - Volume 1: PhyCS, ISBN 978-989-758-006-2, pages 254-259. DOI: 10.5220/0004728302540259


in Bibtex Style

@conference{phycs14,
author={Eun-Hye Jang and Mi-Sook Park and Byoung-Jun Park and Sang-Hyeob Kim and Myung-Ae Chung and Jin-Hun Sohn},
title={Relationship between Affective Dimensions and Physiological Responses Induced by Emotional Stimuli - Base on Affective Dimensions: Arousal, Valence, Intensity and Approach},
booktitle={Proceedings of the International Conference on Physiological Computing Systems - Volume 1: PhyCS,},
year={2014},
pages={254-259},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0004728302540259},
isbn={978-989-758-006-2},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the International Conference on Physiological Computing Systems - Volume 1: PhyCS,
TI - Relationship between Affective Dimensions and Physiological Responses Induced by Emotional Stimuli - Base on Affective Dimensions: Arousal, Valence, Intensity and Approach
SN - 978-989-758-006-2
AU - Jang E.
AU - Park M.
AU - Park B.
AU - Kim S.
AU - Chung M.
AU - Sohn J.
PY - 2014
SP - 254
EP - 259
DO - 10.5220/0004728302540259