Pressure Sensor for Gastrointestinal Intraluminal Measuring

L. R. Silva, P. J. Sousa, L. M. Goncalves, G. Minas

Abstract

This paper reports an innovative technique to measure intraluminal pressure in the gastrointestinal tract (GI), which is typically performed through an exam called oesophageal manometry. This type of measurement is performed with a catheter, comprising several pressure sensors along it, and gives important information for the diagnosis of motility and peristalsis disorders in the GI tract. The presented work explores the use of PDMS polymer (Polydimethylsiloxane) as the support material for the pressure sensors. These PDMS layers are placed in the pressure measurements sites of the catheter. The presented work also explores different materials for the metal strain gauges that act as the pressure sensors. Due to the microfabrication techniques, the presented pressure sensors allow on-chip integration (with other microsensors for GI diagnosis), and its pressure measurements will add essential diagnostic information, not only for the GI motility and peristalsis disorders, but also in the early cancer detection. The initial mechanical tests showed promising results for the intended application. After optimization of the fabrication process, different experiments are scheduled for simulating the pressure signals that would occur in vivo conditions. In summary this method will permit high integration and good sensitivity measurement, while maintaining low fabrication costs.

References

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

R. Silva L., J. Sousa P., M. Goncalves L. and Minas G. (2014). Pressure Sensor for Gastrointestinal Intraluminal Measuring . In Proceedings of the International Conference on Biomedical Electronics and Devices - Volume 1: BIODEVICES, (BIOSTEC 2014) ISBN 978-989-758-013-0, pages 200-206. DOI: 10.5220/0004901102000206


in Bibtex Style

@conference{biodevices14,
author={L. R. Silva and P. J. Sousa and L. M. Goncalves and G. Minas},
title={Pressure Sensor for Gastrointestinal Intraluminal Measuring},
booktitle={Proceedings of the International Conference on Biomedical Electronics and Devices - Volume 1: BIODEVICES, (BIOSTEC 2014)},
year={2014},
pages={200-206},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0004901102000206},
isbn={978-989-758-013-0},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the International Conference on Biomedical Electronics and Devices - Volume 1: BIODEVICES, (BIOSTEC 2014)
TI - Pressure Sensor for Gastrointestinal Intraluminal Measuring
SN - 978-989-758-013-0
AU - R. Silva L.
AU - J. Sousa P.
AU - M. Goncalves L.
AU - Minas G.
PY - 2014
SP - 200
EP - 206
DO - 10.5220/0004901102000206