Acceptation of a Demand-response Enabling Technology for using Electricity at Home upon a Simulated Marketing Campaign - Role of Sociodemographic Variables and Prior Energy Behaviors, in Tandem with Expectations and Attitudes Formed to the Message Target

Maria São João Breda, Marta Lopes

Abstract

The present work addresses the usefulness of IT acceptance frameworks for studying consumers’ adoption intentions upon learning of a new technology described as affording demand-response and energy conservation at home. A survey study was conceived which relied on the exposure of respondents to a marketing campaign for this technology. In preceding steps Theory of Planned Behavior and Technology Acceptance Unified Theory were applied to adequately model and test predictive relations upon intention to adopt that technology and upon expectation of remaining with known methods that compete with the technology, with a Partial Least Squares structural modeling approach. Results suggest that the frameworks are useful for predicting intention to adopt this type of technology. Especially important predictors were Effort Expectancy, Social Factors and Positive Attitudes. Given validation of the nomological network, the goal is to comprehensively integrate differences in adoption across socio-demographic strata and tied to consumers’ energy behaviors with the structural network linking IT predictors to dependents.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Breda M. and Lopes M. (2014). Acceptation of a Demand-response Enabling Technology for using Electricity at Home upon a Simulated Marketing Campaign - Role of Sociodemographic Variables and Prior Energy Behaviors, in Tandem with Expectations and Attitudes Formed to the Message Target . In Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Smart Grids and Green IT Systems - Volume 1: SMARTGREENS, ISBN 978-989-758-025-3, pages 296-304. DOI: 10.5220/0004941902960304


in Bibtex Style

@conference{smartgreens14,
author={Maria São João Breda and Marta Lopes},
title={Acceptation of a Demand-response Enabling Technology for using Electricity at Home upon a Simulated Marketing Campaign - Role of Sociodemographic Variables and Prior Energy Behaviors, in Tandem with Expectations and Attitudes Formed to the Message Target },
booktitle={Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Smart Grids and Green IT Systems - Volume 1: SMARTGREENS,},
year={2014},
pages={296-304},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0004941902960304},
isbn={978-989-758-025-3},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Smart Grids and Green IT Systems - Volume 1: SMARTGREENS,
TI - Acceptation of a Demand-response Enabling Technology for using Electricity at Home upon a Simulated Marketing Campaign - Role of Sociodemographic Variables and Prior Energy Behaviors, in Tandem with Expectations and Attitudes Formed to the Message Target
SN - 978-989-758-025-3
AU - Breda M.
AU - Lopes M.
PY - 2014
SP - 296
EP - 304
DO - 10.5220/0004941902960304