Slrtool: A Tool to Support Collaborative Systematic Literature Reviews

Balbir S. Barn, Franco Raimondi, Lalith Athappian, Tony Clark

Abstract

Systematic Literature Reviews (SLRs) are used in a number of fields to produce unbiased accounts of specific research topics. SLRs and meta-analysis techniques are increasingly being used in other fields as well, from Social Sciences to Software Engineering. This paper presents the SLRTool tool - an open source, web based, multi-user tool that supports the SLR process for a range of research areas. The tool is available at http://www.slrtool.org and is developed using a model-driven approach to enable its adaptation to different disciplines. The functionality of the tool is presented in the context of support for various phases of the SLR process. The use of the tool is illustrated by means of a simulated SLR aiming to map out existing research in the domain of Enterprise Architecture (EA). Commentary on the use of the tool and potential additional benefits are discussed, for example, the role of the tool in non-medical meta-studies.The SLRTool tool supports all phases of the SLR process and lends itself to creating and supporting research communities geared to SLR oriented activities. In particular, the tool could be suitable for the novice researcher community.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

S. Barn B., Raimondi F., Athappian L. and Clark T. (2014). Slrtool: A Tool to Support Collaborative Systematic Literature Reviews . In Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 2: ICEIS, ISBN 978-989-758-028-4, pages 440-447. DOI: 10.5220/0004972204400447


in Bibtex Style

@conference{iceis14,
author={Balbir S. Barn and Franco Raimondi and Lalith Athappian and Tony Clark},
title={Slrtool: A Tool to Support Collaborative Systematic Literature Reviews},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 2: ICEIS,},
year={2014},
pages={440-447},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0004972204400447},
isbn={978-989-758-028-4},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 2: ICEIS,
TI - Slrtool: A Tool to Support Collaborative Systematic Literature Reviews
SN - 978-989-758-028-4
AU - S. Barn B.
AU - Raimondi F.
AU - Athappian L.
AU - Clark T.
PY - 2014
SP - 440
EP - 447
DO - 10.5220/0004972204400447