Intelligent Student Support in the FLIP Learning System based on Student Initial Misconceptions and Student Modelling

Sokratis Karkalas, Sergio Gutiérrez Santos

Abstract

The ’FLIP Learning’ (Flexible, Intelligent and Personalised Learning) is an Exploratory Learning Environment (ELE) for teaching elementary programming to beginners using JavaScript. This paper presents a sub-system in FLIP that can be used to generate individualised real-time support to students depending on their initial misconceptions. The sub-system is intended to be used primarily in the early stages of student engagement in order to help them overcome the constraints of their Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) with minimal assistance from teachers. Since this is an ongoing project we also report on issues related to potential changes or enhancements that will enable a more optimised use under real classroom conditions.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Karkalas S. and Gutiérrez Santos S. (2014). Intelligent Student Support in the FLIP Learning System based on Student Initial Misconceptions and Student Modelling . In Proceedings of the International Conference on Knowledge Engineering and Ontology Development - Volume 1: KEOD, (IC3K 2014) ISBN 978-989-758-049-9, pages 353-360. DOI: 10.5220/0005127603530360


in Bibtex Style

@conference{keod14,
author={Sokratis Karkalas and Sergio Gutiérrez Santos},
title={Intelligent Student Support in the FLIP Learning System based on Student Initial Misconceptions and Student Modelling},
booktitle={Proceedings of the International Conference on Knowledge Engineering and Ontology Development - Volume 1: KEOD, (IC3K 2014)},
year={2014},
pages={353-360},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0005127603530360},
isbn={978-989-758-049-9},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the International Conference on Knowledge Engineering and Ontology Development - Volume 1: KEOD, (IC3K 2014)
TI - Intelligent Student Support in the FLIP Learning System based on Student Initial Misconceptions and Student Modelling
SN - 978-989-758-049-9
AU - Karkalas S.
AU - Gutiérrez Santos S.
PY - 2014
SP - 353
EP - 360
DO - 10.5220/0005127603530360