Resource Allocation and Scheduling based on Emergent behaviours in Multi-Agent Scenarios

Hanno Hildmann, Miquel Martin

Abstract

We present our observations regarding the emergent behaviour in a population of agents following a recently presented nature inspired resource allocation / scheduling method. By having agents distribute tasks among themselves based on their local view of the problem, we successfully balance the work across agents, while remaining flexible to adapt to dynamic scenarios where tasks are added, removed or modified. We explain the approach and within it the mechanisms that give rise to the emergent behaviour; we discuss the model used for the simulations, outline the algorithm and provide results illustrating the performance of the method.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Hildmann H. and Martin M. (2015). Resource Allocation and Scheduling based on Emergent behaviours in Multi-Agent Scenarios . In Proceedings of the International Conference on Operations Research and Enterprise Systems - Volume 1: ICORES, ISBN 978-989-758-075-8, pages 140-147. DOI: 10.5220/0005219501400147


in Bibtex Style

@conference{icores15,
author={Hanno Hildmann and Miquel Martin},
title={Resource Allocation and Scheduling based on Emergent behaviours in Multi-Agent Scenarios},
booktitle={Proceedings of the International Conference on Operations Research and Enterprise Systems - Volume 1: ICORES,},
year={2015},
pages={140-147},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0005219501400147},
isbn={978-989-758-075-8},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the International Conference on Operations Research and Enterprise Systems - Volume 1: ICORES,
TI - Resource Allocation and Scheduling based on Emergent behaviours in Multi-Agent Scenarios
SN - 978-989-758-075-8
AU - Hildmann H.
AU - Martin M.
PY - 2015
SP - 140
EP - 147
DO - 10.5220/0005219501400147