Quadriceps Muscle Fatigue and Comfort Generated by Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation with Current Modulated Waveforms

Tiago Araújo, Ana Anjos, Neuza Nunes, Pedro Rebelo, Hugo Gamboa

Abstract

Introduction: Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is used by physical therapists in the clinic. The efficacy of NMES is limited by the rapid onset muscle fatigue. The role of NMES parameters is muscle fatigue is not clear. Objective: To determine the effects of shape waveform on muscle fatigue, during NMES. Methods: Twelve healthy subjects participated in the study. Subjects were assigned to 1 of 3 groups, randomly. Group assignment determined the order in which they were tested using 3 different shape waveforms. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) was measured during the first session. Fatigue test was applied with amplitude required to elicit 50% of the MVIC. In each 3 testing sessions torque of contraction and level comfort were measured, and percent fatigue was calculated. Analysis of variance tests for dependent samples was used to determine the effect of shape waveform on muscle fatigue and comfort scores Results: The results showed no one shape waveform was most fatigable and that SQ wave induced more uncomfortable stimulus.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Araújo T., Anjos A., Nunes N., Rebelo P. and Gamboa H. (2015). Quadriceps Muscle Fatigue and Comfort Generated by Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation with Current Modulated Waveforms . In Proceedings of the International Conference on Bio-inspired Systems and Signal Processing - Volume 1: BIOSIGNALS, (BIOSTEC 2015) ISBN 978-989-758-069-7, pages 92-98. DOI: 10.5220/0005267400920098


in Bibtex Style

@conference{biosignals15,
author={Tiago Araújo and Ana Anjos and Neuza Nunes and Pedro Rebelo and Hugo Gamboa},
title={Quadriceps Muscle Fatigue and Comfort Generated by Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation with Current Modulated Waveforms},
booktitle={Proceedings of the International Conference on Bio-inspired Systems and Signal Processing - Volume 1: BIOSIGNALS, (BIOSTEC 2015)},
year={2015},
pages={92-98},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0005267400920098},
isbn={978-989-758-069-7},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the International Conference on Bio-inspired Systems and Signal Processing - Volume 1: BIOSIGNALS, (BIOSTEC 2015)
TI - Quadriceps Muscle Fatigue and Comfort Generated by Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation with Current Modulated Waveforms
SN - 978-989-758-069-7
AU - Araújo T.
AU - Anjos A.
AU - Nunes N.
AU - Rebelo P.
AU - Gamboa H.
PY - 2015
SP - 92
EP - 98
DO - 10.5220/0005267400920098