The Epistemology of Resilient Organizations - Implications for Business Continuity Management

Eva Gatarik, Viktor Kulhavy, Rainer Born

Abstract

Pointing out flaws and errors can be a risky pastime for those employees, whose information conflicts with theories and rules held dear by management. However, effective performance does not consist in strictly adhering to established rules. Instead, it is driven by a continuous search for meaning within organizational environments, which are, in turn, enacted upon emerging and redrafted meaning. Meaning based upon lived and reflected experience provides a corrective use of rules and, hence, more appropriate, effective results. Effective performance arises out of plausibility rather than accuracy. In the event of uncertainty, equivocation and doubt, people in organizations claiming resilience should jointly classify and interpret observed data into new knowledge so that subsequent action can tap into the prevailing business climate, reduce ambiguity, and offer more exciting prospects. A framework is introduced and applied to justify an organizational epistemology to assist the construction, processing and justification of meaning within organizations.

References

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Gatarik E., Kulhavy V. and Born R. (2015). The Epistemology of Resilient Organizations - Implications for Business Continuity Management . In Proceedings of the 7th International Joint Conference on Knowledge Discovery, Knowledge Engineering and Knowledge Management - Volume 3: KMIS, (IC3K 2015) ISBN 978-989-758-158-8, pages 93-97. DOI: 10.5220/0005563100930097


in Bibtex Style

@conference{kmis15,
author={Eva Gatarik and Viktor Kulhavy and Rainer Born},
title={The Epistemology of Resilient Organizations - Implications for Business Continuity Management},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 7th International Joint Conference on Knowledge Discovery, Knowledge Engineering and Knowledge Management - Volume 3: KMIS, (IC3K 2015)},
year={2015},
pages={93-97},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0005563100930097},
isbn={978-989-758-158-8},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 7th International Joint Conference on Knowledge Discovery, Knowledge Engineering and Knowledge Management - Volume 3: KMIS, (IC3K 2015)
TI - The Epistemology of Resilient Organizations - Implications for Business Continuity Management
SN - 978-989-758-158-8
AU - Gatarik E.
AU - Kulhavy V.
AU - Born R.
PY - 2015
SP - 93
EP - 97
DO - 10.5220/0005563100930097