A Practical Guide to Developing a Knowledge Management Culture (KMC) in a Non-Profit Organization (NPO)

Tomasz Kampioni, Felicia Ciolfitto

Abstract

Knowledge is the most important asset of an organization. Being able to preserve organizational knowledge determines profitability, sustainability, competitiveness and the ability to grow. No organization can afford to lose its knowledge base. According to the World Economy Forum, 95 percent of CEOs claim that Knowledge Management (KM) is a critical factor in an organization’s success; and 80 percent of companies mentioned in Fortune Magazine have staff assigned specifically to KM. Developing a culture of sharing and creating knowledge is a long process that requires changing people’s values, beliefs and behaviours. Staff must be convinced of KM benefits and be engaged in programs and initiatives that support transfer of knowledge. Many organizations focus on technology as a silver bullet, losing sight of the fact that people as well as processes are important factors in successful implementation of Knowledge Management Culture (KMC). In this article we will discuss the concept of a knowledge management culture. We will specifically explore how a non-profit organization (NPO) assessed its current environment and capitalized on its existing KMC as a way to leverage its KM program. Creating a KMC is key since technology does not manage knowledge – people do!

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Kampioni T. and Ciolfitto F. (2015). A Practical Guide to Developing a Knowledge Management Culture (KMC) in a Non-Profit Organization (NPO) . In Proceedings of the 7th International Joint Conference on Knowledge Discovery, Knowledge Engineering and Knowledge Management - Volume 3: KMIS, (IC3K 2015) ISBN 978-989-758-158-8, pages 27-38. DOI: 10.5220/0005587100270038


in Bibtex Style

@conference{kmis15,
author={Tomasz Kampioni and Felicia Ciolfitto},
title={A Practical Guide to Developing a Knowledge Management Culture (KMC) in a Non-Profit Organization (NPO)},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 7th International Joint Conference on Knowledge Discovery, Knowledge Engineering and Knowledge Management - Volume 3: KMIS, (IC3K 2015)},
year={2015},
pages={27-38},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0005587100270038},
isbn={978-989-758-158-8},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 7th International Joint Conference on Knowledge Discovery, Knowledge Engineering and Knowledge Management - Volume 3: KMIS, (IC3K 2015)
TI - A Practical Guide to Developing a Knowledge Management Culture (KMC) in a Non-Profit Organization (NPO)
SN - 978-989-758-158-8
AU - Kampioni T.
AU - Ciolfitto F.
PY - 2015
SP - 27
EP - 38
DO - 10.5220/0005587100270038