A Formal Holon Model for Operating Future Energy Grids during Blackouts

Siavash Valipour, Florian Volk, Tim Grube, Leon Böck, Ludwig Karg, Max Mühlhäuser

Abstract

Modern energy grids introduce local energy producers into city networks. Whenever a city network is disconnected from the distribution grid, a blackout occurs and local producers are disabled. Micro grids circumvent blackouts by leveraging these local producers to power a fixed subset of consumers. In this paper, we evolve micro grids to Holons, which overcome the need for fixed subsets and power as much of the city network as possible. We contribute a formal model of Holons and investigate the impact of the Holon concept in a simulation with 10,000 randomly generated city networks. These city networks are based on parameters obtained from a real-world test site in a medium-sized German city. Our results show that the Holon approach can supply an average fraction of 22.08% of any city network, even when fixed micro grids would fail to power the city network as a whole.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Valipour S., Volk F., Grube T., Böck L., Karg L. and Mühlhäuser M. (2016). A Formal Holon Model for Operating Future Energy Grids during Blackouts . In Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Smart Cities and Green ICT Systems - Volume 1: SMARTGREENS, ISBN 978-989-758-184-7, pages 146-153. DOI: 10.5220/0005768801460153


in Bibtex Style

@conference{smartgreens16,
author={Siavash Valipour and Florian Volk and Tim Grube and Leon Böck and Ludwig Karg and Max Mühlhäuser},
title={A Formal Holon Model for Operating Future Energy Grids during Blackouts},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Smart Cities and Green ICT Systems - Volume 1: SMARTGREENS,},
year={2016},
pages={146-153},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0005768801460153},
isbn={978-989-758-184-7},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Smart Cities and Green ICT Systems - Volume 1: SMARTGREENS,
TI - A Formal Holon Model for Operating Future Energy Grids during Blackouts
SN - 978-989-758-184-7
AU - Valipour S.
AU - Volk F.
AU - Grube T.
AU - Böck L.
AU - Karg L.
AU - Mühlhäuser M.
PY - 2016
SP - 146
EP - 153
DO - 10.5220/0005768801460153