Ordering Matters: An Experimental Study of Ranking Influence on Results Selection Behavior during Exploratory Search

Emanuel Felipe Duarte, Lucas Pupulin Nanni, Ricardo Theis Geraldi, Edson OliveiraJr, Valéria Delisandra Feltrim, Roberto Pereira

Abstract

The design of Exploratory Search tools acquires more importance as the amount of information on the Web grows. Accordingly, informed design decisions concerning the users’ behavior during search activities can be used in novel approaches for Exploratory Search tools. With regard to users’ behavior on search result selection, literature indicates higher ranked results tend to attract more attention and, therefore, more hits. However, the cause of such behavior is not clear. We experimentally investigate the hypothesis of this behavior being due to ranking. A group of 72 participants was asked to select a search result from a randomly ordered results list. The experiment was carried out on paper to remove specific search engine and digital medium biases. We obtained evidence indicating there is a trend towards choosing higher ranked results even in a different medium and in the context of an Exploratory Search, corroborating to the hypothesis that ranking has influence on users’ selection behavior.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Duarte E., Nanni L., Geraldi R., OliveiraJr E., Feltrim V. and Pereira R. (2016). Ordering Matters: An Experimental Study of Ranking Influence on Results Selection Behavior during Exploratory Search . In Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 1: ICEIS, ISBN 978-989-758-187-8, pages 427-434. DOI: 10.5220/0005828704270434


in Bibtex Style

@conference{iceis16,
author={Emanuel Felipe Duarte and Lucas Pupulin Nanni and Ricardo Theis Geraldi and Edson OliveiraJr and Valéria Delisandra Feltrim and Roberto Pereira},
title={Ordering Matters: An Experimental Study of Ranking Influence on Results Selection Behavior during Exploratory Search},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 1: ICEIS,},
year={2016},
pages={427-434},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0005828704270434},
isbn={978-989-758-187-8},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 1: ICEIS,
TI - Ordering Matters: An Experimental Study of Ranking Influence on Results Selection Behavior during Exploratory Search
SN - 978-989-758-187-8
AU - Duarte E.
AU - Nanni L.
AU - Geraldi R.
AU - OliveiraJr E.
AU - Feltrim V.
AU - Pereira R.
PY - 2016
SP - 427
EP - 434
DO - 10.5220/0005828704270434