Interactions, Transitions and Inference Rules in Semantically Integrated Conceptual Modelling

Remigijus Gustas, Prima Gustiene

Abstract

To obtain value from the graphical representations that are used by different stakeholders during the system development process, they must be integrated. This is important to achieve a holistic understanding about system specification. Integration can be reached via modelling process. Currently, most of information system modelling methods present different modelling aspects in disparate modelling dimensions and therefore it is difficult to achieve semantic integrity of various diagrams. In this paper, we present semantically integrated conceptual modelling method for information system analysis and design. The foundation of this modelling method is based on interactions. This way of modelling provides possibility of integration of business processes and business data. The inference rules of interactions help in reasoning about the decomposition of concepts. In this method, decomposition of the system is graphically described as classification, inheritance or composition of organizational and technical system components.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Gustas R. and Gustiene P. (2016). Interactions, Transitions and Inference Rules in Semantically Integrated Conceptual Modelling . In Proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium on Business Modeling and Software Design - Volume 1: BMSD, ISBN 978-989-758-190-8, pages 11-21. DOI: 10.5220/0006221700110021


in Bibtex Style

@conference{bmsd16,
author={Remigijus Gustas and Prima Gustiene},
title={Interactions, Transitions and Inference Rules in Semantically Integrated Conceptual Modelling},
booktitle={Proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium on Business Modeling and Software Design - Volume 1: BMSD,},
year={2016},
pages={11-21},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0006221700110021},
isbn={978-989-758-190-8},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium on Business Modeling and Software Design - Volume 1: BMSD,
TI - Interactions, Transitions and Inference Rules in Semantically Integrated Conceptual Modelling
SN - 978-989-758-190-8
AU - Gustas R.
AU - Gustiene P.
PY - 2016
SP - 11
EP - 21
DO - 10.5220/0006221700110021