Avoiding Failure in Modern Game Design with Academic Content - A Recipe, an Anti-Pattern and Applications Thereof

Kay Berkling, Heiko Faller, Micha Piertzik

Abstract

Educational Games tend not to be designed by game engineers. They usually do not compare either in graphics or in addictiveness to small games that people have installed on their mobile devices. In order to understand why people play today, a survey was conducted to determine players’ explicit and implicit knowledge about motivators in addictive games. Based on the results of the questionnaire, we studied demographic preferences and commonalities in order to develop a recipe for the design that fits the general current market. An anti-pattern was a by-product of this process. Both are then applied towards an analysis of existing games and the design of a new one.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Berkling K., Faller H. and Piertzik M. (2017). Avoiding Failure in Modern Game Design with Academic Content - A Recipe, an Anti-Pattern and Applications Thereof . In Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 2: CSEDU, ISBN 978-989-758-240-0, pages 25-36. DOI: 10.5220/0006281800250036


in Bibtex Style

@conference{csedu17,
author={Kay Berkling and Heiko Faller and Micha Piertzik},
title={Avoiding Failure in Modern Game Design with Academic Content - A Recipe, an Anti-Pattern and Applications Thereof},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 2: CSEDU,},
year={2017},
pages={25-36},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0006281800250036},
isbn={978-989-758-240-0},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 2: CSEDU,
TI - Avoiding Failure in Modern Game Design with Academic Content - A Recipe, an Anti-Pattern and Applications Thereof
SN - 978-989-758-240-0
AU - Berkling K.
AU - Faller H.
AU - Piertzik M.
PY - 2017
SP - 25
EP - 36
DO - 10.5220/0006281800250036