An Interactive Book Authoring Tool to Introduce Programming Logic in Schools

André Campos, Alberto Signoretti, Mário Rodrigues

Abstract

In the past years, there was a growing interest in teaching computational thinking in elementary and high school institutions. Although the idea is spread and well accepted among academics, it has been rarely put in practice in the classrooms. Currently, when a programming-related activity is offered, with some few exceptions, it is usually presented as an extra-curricular (optional) activity. However, it does not need to be disassociated from the common school curriculum. The present work is based on the idea that programming logic can be used transversally with different subjects, such as history, geography, science, literacy, mathematics, among others. The authors envisage to accomplish this goal by enabling programming as a supporting tool for teachers and students, allowing them to create digital interactive books. The tool, named piBook, has its main focus in the production of interactive storytelling using non-linear narratives. Besides, it is also possible to create textual games (such as role-playing games), interactive activities (such as quizzes), tutorials, chatbots and similar applications.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Campos A., Signoretti A. and Rodrigues M. (2017). An Interactive Book Authoring Tool to Introduce Programming Logic in Schools . In Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU, ISBN 978-989-758-239-4, pages 140-148. DOI: 10.5220/0006333501400148


in Bibtex Style

@conference{csedu17,
author={André Campos and Alberto Signoretti and Mário Rodrigues},
title={An Interactive Book Authoring Tool to Introduce Programming Logic in Schools},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU,},
year={2017},
pages={140-148},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0006333501400148},
isbn={978-989-758-239-4},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU,
TI - An Interactive Book Authoring Tool to Introduce Programming Logic in Schools
SN - 978-989-758-239-4
AU - Campos A.
AU - Signoretti A.
AU - Rodrigues M.
PY - 2017
SP - 140
EP - 148
DO - 10.5220/0006333501400148