Using Educational Robotics with Primary Level Students (6-12 Years Old) in Different Scholar Scenarios: Learned Lessons

Alfredo Pina, Gabriel Rubio

Abstract

In this paper, we describe the experiences we have been carrying out the last years using educational robotics in classroom at the primary level, mainly with boys and girls from 6-7 to 12-14 years old. We have set up a constructivist Problem Based Learning Approach in order to use robotics to teaching/learning key competences and standard curricula topics. We have introduced the possibility of working with virtual robots as well as with real robots. In order to achieve that, firstly we chose real robots (Beebot and Lego Mindstorms NXT/EV3 respectively). Secondly we implemented software tools for the virtual robots using either our own developed software or Scratch or Byob/Snap, and thirdly we designed different projects and materials that could work with all those technological artifacts. Afterwards, and in order to validate such tools and such methodological approach, we used all of them in three different educational environments: firstly in a series of teacher’s training summer courses (11, 12 years old, in August from 2012 until 2016), secondly in the First Lego League (FLL) contests (10-14 years old, which took place from 2009 until 2016) and then with a teacher’s teams network we promoted (7-14 years old, consolidated in 2014- 2015 and still in place up to date). The results are promising as we have managed to create a sustainable network of schools and a significant group of people working in a coordinated way. The Educational authorities support our work and we have set up a binding agreement between the university, the schools and the Planetarium of Pamplona, in order to work both in the school and out of the school (the Planetarium plays the role of a Science and Technological Museum).

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Pina A. and Rubio G. (2017). Using Educational Robotics with Primary Level Students (6-12 Years Old) in Different Scholar Scenarios: Learned Lessons . In Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU, ISBN 978-989-758-239-4, pages 196-208. DOI: 10.5220/0006381501960208


in Bibtex Style

@conference{csedu17,
author={Alfredo Pina and Gabriel Rubio},
title={Using Educational Robotics with Primary Level Students (6-12 Years Old) in Different Scholar Scenarios: Learned Lessons},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU,},
year={2017},
pages={196-208},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0006381501960208},
isbn={978-989-758-239-4},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU,
TI - Using Educational Robotics with Primary Level Students (6-12 Years Old) in Different Scholar Scenarios: Learned Lessons
SN - 978-989-758-239-4
AU - Pina A.
AU - Rubio G.
PY - 2017
SP - 196
EP - 208
DO - 10.5220/0006381501960208