Do Your Students Really Need that $200 Ebook? Predatory Publishers and Ethical Questions

Tamara Powell

Abstract

Textbook costs have risen 1041% since 1977 (Popken, 2015). The internet allows educators to create and disseminate educational resources and to share the wealth and the creations using special licenses. The research is now in, and open educational resources, or OERs, have been shown to have just as good as, and sometimes better, learning outcomes than standard publisher materials. To keep profits flowing, publishers have designed impressive software packages marketed as superior to standard textbooks. For a hefty price tag, students are promised superior, adaptive, and even miraculous learning experiences while the instructor languishes in the background. This paper asks the question, what are we selling students, and what are we losing for ourselves as teachers in this educational material jungle.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Powell T. (2019). Do Your Students Really Need that $200 Ebook? Predatory Publishers and Ethical Questions.In Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 2: CSEDU, ISBN 978-989-758-367-4, pages 191-195. DOI: 10.5220/0007586201910195


in Bibtex Style

@conference{csedu19,
author={Tamara Powell},
title={Do Your Students Really Need that $200 Ebook? Predatory Publishers and Ethical Questions},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 2: CSEDU,},
year={2019},
pages={191-195},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0007586201910195},
isbn={978-989-758-367-4},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF

JO - Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 2: CSEDU,
TI - Do Your Students Really Need that $200 Ebook? Predatory Publishers and Ethical Questions
SN - 978-989-758-367-4
AU - Powell T.
PY - 2019
SP - 191
EP - 195
DO - 10.5220/0007586201910195